Eucharistic Meditation

“When he had fasted forty days and forty nights.” You see, brothers, that the forty-day fast is not a human invention. Its authority is divine. … The God and man in you fasts, starves for your sake—you, who do not know how to eat and therefore cannot even starve. Therefore, when Christ fasts for your sake, he starves for your sake. … Feeling hungry and overcoming hunger are human work. There is no hunger in God’s power. Therefore Christ did not faint from fasting or starve. He was hungry so that the Devil would have a reason to tempt him.

Hear what the Devil offered to the hungry one: “Command these stones to become bread.” He offers stones to the hungry. Such is always the nature of the enemy. This is how the originator of death and envier of life shepherds. “Command these stones to become bread.” Devil, your foresight failed. He who can change stones into bread can also turn hunger into abundance. You wretch know how to be evil but you are not able to tempt with vessels, and are unable to offer the hungry something fine rather than something austere.

… See, Tempter, how all your tricks have been destroyed in the presence of Christ. He who turned water into wine is surely able to turn stones into bread. But signs are performed for faith, not for plots.

“Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes out of the mouth of the Lord.” Hear and understand the word of the Father, to eat for your hunger the words of our salvation instead of bread, so that man may live forever.

Peter Chrysologus (c. 380—c. 450), Sermo XI